Pressroom

cosmos-a-93Nautilus
Buddhism Is Not Just Compatible with Modern Cosmology, It Welcomes It

by Chris Impey
January, 2017

Chris Impey, distinguished astronomer and Science for Monks veteran teacher, discusses some of the big ideas in cosmology and how they resonate with Tibetan buddhist philosophy.

Read the full article on Nautilus


two-weeks-in-tibet-3Kaleidoscope
Two Weeks in Tibet, sort of: The Value of a Cultural Exchange between Science and Spirituality

by Scott Stambach
Spring, 2016

Scott Stambach, high-school science teacher and senior fellow with the Knowles Science Teaching Foundation (KSTF) authors a wonderful article about his experiences in India working with Tibetan monks and nuns spearheading science education initiatives.

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Read full article online at KSTF


Templeton Press
Humble Before the Void

by Chris ImpeyHumble_Void
June, 2014

“This book will provide readers with a greater awareness of the spirit of curiosity and inquiry that lies at the heart of the Buddhist tradition, as well as the fruitfulness of maintaining active communication between the Buddhist and scientific commu­nities.” —from the Foreword by His Holiness the Dalai Lama

In a vivid and compelling narrative, Impey intro­duces us to a group of exiled Tibetan monks whose charm, tenacity and unbridled enthusiasm for learning is infectious. Impey marvels not only at their enthusiasm, but at their tireless diligence that allows the monks to painstakingly build intri­cate sand mandalas—that can be swept away in an instant. He observes them as they meticulously count galaxies and notes how their enthusiasm and diligence stands in contrast to many American students who are frequently turned off by sci­ence’s inability to deliver easy, immediate payoffs. Because the Buddhist monks have had a limited science education, Impey must devise creative pedagogy. His new students immediately take to his inspired teaching methods, whether it’s the use of balloons to demonstrate the Hubble expansion or donning an Einstein mask to explain the theory of relativity.

Print and digital editions


powerHouse Books
Beyond the Robe

by Bobby Sager
November, 2012

Beyond the Robe tells the story of the Science for Monks program and what it reveals about the larger role Tibetan Buddhist monks and nuns can play in their monasteries, in their communities, and in the world at large.

Link to book’s website


San Francisco Chronicle
Delving into 6 senses through visual art

by Meredith May
May, 2012

After a decade of study under top scientists from the Smithsonian and the Exploratorium museums, a group of Tibetan Buddhists are displaying their painting, which depict the five senses, at the Exploratorium.

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Read full article online


The Washington Post
His Holiness the Dalai Lama wins Templeton Prize

by Chris Herlinger
New York, March 29, 2012

The Dalai Lama has been awarded the Templeton Prize, a 1.7 million dollar award for his work with science and religion. His Holiness will accept the award on May 14th in London, England.

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Read full article in the Washington Post


Washington PostDSC_0243
Smithsonian has hand in Indian science exhibit planned by Tibetan monks

by Amy Yee
New Dehli, May 13, 2010

NEW DELHI – The northern Indian town of Bir was greeted with an unusual sight when Scott Schmidt carried six-foot-long plywood sheets on his head through the streets. Schmidt, who develops exhibits for the Smithsonian, had retrieved the wood from the village carpenter and toted it on his head to the Buddhist institute he was visiting. “I got impatient,” said Schmidt. “I probably broke every rule of how a Westerner is supposed to act in a village in India.”

Schmidt was helping a group of 30 Tibetan monks plan “The World of Your Senses,” a bilingual science exhibition displayed last month in New Delhi at the India Habitat Center, an arts and culture venue in India’s capital.

Read full article in the Washington Post


New York Timesnews_NYT_2009_ScienceForMonks
Tibetan Monks and Nuns Turn Their Minds Toward Science

by Amy Yee
June 29, 2009

DHARAMSALA, India — Tibetan monks and nuns spend their lives studying the inner world of the mind rather than the physical world of matter. Yet for one month this spring a group of 91 monastics devoted themselves to the corporeal realm of science.

Instead of delving into Buddhist texts on karma and emptiness, they learned about Galileo’s law of accelerated motion, chromosomes, neurons and the Big Bang, among other far-ranging topics.

Read full article in the New York Times